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thephotosociety
thephotosociety

@thephotosociety

The Photo Society—a collective of over 170 National Geographic photographers. Sponsorship inquiries: [email protected]

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thephotosociety
thephotosociety
Photo by @andyparkinsonphoto/@thephotosociety Red fox portrait - There are times when working with habituated animals, such as this red fox, can be a useful addition to creating the kind of images that are much more unattainable in the wild. Whilst this is undoubtedly a completely wild red fox, free to roam and travel how he pleases he has, as any intelligent animal would, come to realise that keeping the company of certain people definitely has its benefits when it comes to acquiring food. As such, having never come into conflict with any unpleasant individuals he has lost his innate fear of people and instead sees them as a useful resource. Of course this confidence comes with certain risks but as a photographer I have no control over whether or not tourists or visitors to this particular location do or do not feed the wildlife but it did at least give me the opportunity to capture some intimate images that have in my entire 17 year career so far eluded me. The downside of course, apart from the obvious risk to the fox from some mindless cretin, is that the fox, as he does in this image, can look a little too relaxed, a little too sleepy. Nevertheless the advantages of proximity and more control over light can occasionally pay dividends but I maintain that nothing can compare to the feeling of looking through one's lens and seeing the wide open and alert eyes of a non-habituated fox staring right back. For now though I thought I'd introduce you to this slightly rotund and overfed scrounger, basking and begging in the late evening sunlight. Please #followme at @andyparkinsonphoto to keep up-to-date with my images @andyparkinsonphoto@thephotosociety #redfox#ethicsbeforeimages #phototips#educateandinspire #nature #naturelovers#featuredwildlife
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Photo by @ShonePhoto (Robbie Shone) // Mountain regions respond sensitively to climate change. Taking advantage of Alpine caves, a team of scientists led by Swiss Paleoclimatologist Dr. Marc Luetscher from the Swiss Institute for Speleology and Karst Studies (SISKA), is working to understand how permafrost has evolved through time. Ice caves form through a combination of snow intrusion and/or congelation of water infiltrating a karst system. Often up to several centuries old, the climate record of this ice remains largely under-studied. Today we are also able to tell if a cave was an ice cave in the past. This is achieved by looking for cryogenic cave calcites. These form when water enters a cave, and freezes and turns to ice. In this process, the water becomes progressively enriched in ions to the point that it becomes super-saturated. Pictured here, scientists are dwarfed by giant ice formations towering above them inside Schwarzmooskogel Eishöhle in Austria.
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Photo by @johnstanmeyer - Outtakes ~ She appeared briefly, flowing through the mystical tomb of Shopan-Ata, a spirit while on pilgrimage to Shopan-Ata, Kazakhstan. - @natgeo @natgeocreative@thephotosociety #kazakhstan #ShopanAta#grave #spirituality #red
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Photo by @jim_sugar | For the third year in a row, @StacyGold allowed me to climb up on the National Geographic’s expensive office furniture to shoot a group photo of the photographers assembled for the @natgeocreative annual winter seminar. A spicy, lively group. If you know your photojournalists, then there are familiar faces here. Since I had my back to the wall and couldn’t move backward another inch, the 7mm lens on the Lumix GX-85 allowed me to make this wide shot. Thanks Stacy! @natgeocreative @thephotosociety @natgeo
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Photos by @michaelchristopherbrown // I sometimes found little difference between reservation land and the rest of the United States, as reservations are generally checker boarded with regards to ownership and jurisdiction. Some land is tribal, other land might be county, state or federal. Often a reservation includes non-native mostly white populations who, due to economic status, generally inhabit the best, most valuable land. But reservations in general are often not the best and most fertile land in a region, or even the homeland of a particular tribe but an assigned location granted through American congressional and executive order. Last fall Michael Christopher Brown created a story celebrating Native Americans living within several of the 326 reservations located throughout the United States. Though the majority of the 2.5 million Native Americans and Alaska Natives live somewhere other than the reservations, there are about 1 million from the 567 federally recognized tribes still living on reservations, land that is representative of both tribal success as well as the myriad issues perennially facing the tribes. This project was made by the generous support of @SonyAlpha. Be sure to visit AlphaUniverse.com to see the entire story. #Sony #Sponsored
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Photo by @argonautphoto (Aaron Huey). Sunset prayers outside an intricately tiled Sufi shrine (the tomb of Roz-e-Dahani) in Pir Jo Goth, Sindh, Pakistan. This Sufi community is lead by the 8th Pir Pagara in a lineage that dates back to the early 1800s. The Pir is a spiritual guide who accepts initiates as his disciples. Throughout the instruction period, the initiate often experiences visions and dreams during personal spiritual exercises. The visions are interpreted by the Pir. To see a whole series on Sufism over the coming week follow @argonautphoto.
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Photo by @bethjwald // A Chilean gaucho (also called a “huaso”) rides through pastures high above Lago General Carrera and the Murta Valley in the Aysén region of southern Chile. Aysén is Chile’s least populated region, and is known for its wild places – mountains, remote fjords, dense forests and free flowing rivers. But there are also a sprinkling of hardy communities throughout Aysén who depend on small-scale farming and ranching, living a traditional “gaucho” lifestyle little changed in the last decades. These proud traditions and livelihoods, and the pristine nature of Aysen, have been threatened in the last decade by plans for large scale hydro-dams and industrial development. But last week an important and historic step was taken to preserve both culture and wilderness in southern Chile when Chilean President Michelle Bachelet joined forces with Kristine Tompkins of Tompkins Conservation to make history and create two new National Parks-Patagonia National Park and Pumalin National Park, in Aysen and Palena respectively. They also added ten million acres to the Chile’s National Park system, including one million acres donated by Tompkins Conservation, the largest single act of wildlands philanthropy ever made. In total, 5 new Parks, all in southern Chile, will be created. As part of this initiative, #Chile will create a “Route of Parks”, linking these southern treasures and the increased tourism will create employment and economic opportunities for local communities without destroying their way of life or the environment on which they depend. The handful of families who live in Murta Valley, located between the brand new Patagonia National Park and Cerro Castillo National Park (created in 2017) will certainly benefit. Follow me at @bethjwald as I post more photos to celebrate Chile’s leadership in conservation and the astounding contribution of Kris and Doug Tompkins to the preservation of wild places and creatures. For more info: www.tompkinsconservatin.org, #chileparks #carreteraaustral #parquesnacionales #patagonia #gaucho #huaso @conservacionpatagonica @thephotosociety
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Photo by @davidalanharvey . Casares, Spain. A small farm village surrounded by olive and orange trees, it’s only 10 miles or so from the heavily touristed Costa del Sol. Early morning light just washes the church for a few seconds. It took me a few days to find the right spot and get the timing right for this shot for a NatGeo Magazine story on Spain. 4 months overall in the making . It’s a complex country. Each picture usually taking days to shoot. Mostly I’m shooting people and getting in the mix of daily life. Yet magazines always need a scene setter to give a sense of place. When shooting landscapes one finds the moments are just as fleeting as for people shots. All photography, all life, is timing and timing.
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Photo by @CristinaMittermeier // In the highlands of Papua New Guinea makeup and beauty take on a whole new meaning! When they become “of age”, men from tribes, like the Huli Wigmen, are exiled into men-only villages where they spend months if not years, growing their hair. Once it is long enough, they cut it at the root and create fantastic wigs that are then decorated with feathers from birds of paradise, seashells and even shiny lids from tin cans! These wigs are then worn on special occasions, like the famous Sing Sing festival, where I photographed this colorful group. Want to learn more about the customs and costumes of indigenous tribes? #Followme at @CristinaMittermeier @NatGeoCreative @ThePhotoSociety #makeup #fashion #beauty #tribal #culture
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Photo by @nickcobbing - Zoom in near the top left of the image to see this solitary figure standing on a glacier on Greenland. This picture was made from a small helicopter which was also used to set down and collect our colleague from the ice. She was very relieved to get back inside -while waiting it crossed her mind how she’d return home if we couldn’t land to pick her up! It’s coming up 10 years since I made this image, during that time the impact of increased warming has been experienced right across Greenland -particularly on the glaciers which transport inland ice towards the coast. Detailed research has shown many glaciers to be ‘speeding up’ and losing mass. - #ice #glacier #greenland #climatechange #blue #melting #scale #adventure #aerial
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Photos by @DGuttenfelder // David, who has already worked extensively in North Korea, journeyed last fall through #SouthKorea to reveal the ways these two nations have dramatically diverged, and the many quiet and beautiful ways they remain echoes of one another. This project was made by the generous support of @SonyAlpha. Be sure to visit AlphaUniverse.com to see the entire story. #Sony #Sponsored
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Photo by @johnstanmeyer - Always the pleasant unexpected during the expected, offers so much to my lack of expecting anything at all. Thankful when a light shun in the emerald chambers upon a priest befuddled by curiosity in the ancient church of Biete Medhane Alem, Lalibela, Ethiopia. - @natgeo @natgeocreative@thephotosociety #ethiopia #lalibela #BieteMedhaneAlem #church #priest #portrait #emerald #red
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